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Preconference [clear filter]
Sunday, July 31
 

9:00am

Command Line Interface #1713
Limited Capacity seats available

*** Date Changed from Monday, August 1, to Sunday, July 31. ***


Fees: Advance / Regular
SAA Members: $205 / $265
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $235 / $295
Nonmembers: $265 / $325


Course Description
(1 day, .75 CEUs; 1 DAS, 5 ARCs)

For archivists working in contemporary collecting institutions, basic digital skills are essential. As technology makes it easier to create text, image, audio, and video files and archivists continue digitizing analog collections, the impact of electronic records on our work only increases. For archives, there is a heightened risk of loss or inability to access these records if basic computing skills for ingest, management, and preservation are not acquired as part of the archivist’s toolkit.

In this course you will learn hands-on skills for working with digital archival objects at the most basic levels: files, data, and the computer operating systems in which they live. These basics establish manual and automated capacities for protecting the bits, automating/extracting metadata, and preparing for the next steps of building and managing digital archives. You will get an overview of the landscape of digital collections in archives, including digitized materials, born-digital acquisitions, and the various approaches employed in the field to acquire, stabilize, describe, store, and preserve collection content. And you will learn simple methods to deconstruct file formats in order to understand the difference between file metadata and file system metadata. More specifically, you will receive an introduction to and hands-on training in the use of command line programs for working with files and metadata that come included with many operating systems, as well as additional GUI and command line tools such as MediaConch (previously MediaInfo), ExifTool, MDQC, NARA FileAnalyzer, DataAccessioner, Bulk Extractor, Bagger/BagIt/Exactly, and Fixityall tools that support identification, transfer, storage, metadata generation, and monitoring of digital collections. You will come away with a clear knowledge of how to use computers' natural languages, how to combine multiple tools and skills, what role these play in collection management workflows, and a sense of how to implement their use. Participants will be required to use a laptop with all applications downloaded and installed in order to participate in hands-on exercises. All applications are available free of charge on the Internet. A list of applications and file sets will be distributed to participants.

Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:



  • Articulate the basic functions and components of computers, computer applications, and their salient features.

  • Describe the basic composition of an individual digital file and how computers and software create and work with them. 

  • Identify applicable data and metadata that enable a digital file to be understood, preserved, and used. 



This course is less about a specific processing approach and more about providing archivists with basic computing skills that will help them make use of any tools that come their way and will help them speak the native language of the computing environments in which files (archival objects) reside.

Who Should Attend?: Archivists, Managers, Practitioners, Museum Professionals, and Records Managers

Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
avatar for Bertram Lyons

Bertram Lyons

Archivist, Senior Consultant, AVPreserve
Bertram Lyons, Senior Consultant at AVPreserve, is an archivist with expertise in digital acquisition and digitization. Most recently, Bert has worked with colleagues at the Library of Congress' American Folklife Center (AFC) to develop tools, policies, and partnerships around the development and management of digital collections. During his tenure, AFC has become a leader in digital preservation at the Library of Congress, having built their collection to over 500,000 digital objects and integrated... Read More →



Sunday July 31, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Undergraduate Learning Center, Clough Room 423 Georgia Tech Library, 266 4th St. NW, Atlanta, GA

9:00am

Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) #1705
Limited Capacity seats available

Fees: Advance / Regular
SAA Members: $189 / $249
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $219 / $279
Nonmembers: $249 / $299


Course Description
(1 day, .75 CEUs, 1 A&D, 5 ARCs)

This new version of Describing Archives: A Content Standard, the provides those familiar with the processes of archival arrangement and description and are comfortable with the basics of DACS (U.S. standard for describing archival materials and their creators) with an opportunity to work through a set of new, creative exercises and discussions designed to create effective, insightful archival description. This course is active and hands-on, and participants are encouraged to engage with one another and the instructor learning to use sound judgment in interpreting the principles and guidance that DACS provides.

Participants will receive an email in mid-July 2016 with a link to online video modules that provide an introduction to the key principles, concepts, and elements of DACS. It is imperative that participants know and understand the content of these videos prior to attending the course as instruction builds on the videos and concentrates on the application of DACS.

*This course is a requirement of the Arrangement & Description Certificate Program.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:


  • Articulate what DACS is (and isn’t) and how its basic principles relate to archival theory and practice

  • Distinguish between minimal and value-added descriptions for archival materials and creators

  • Apply DACS rules to identify and formulate required elements of archival description

  • Learn how DACS can be applied to the various activities of the archival enterprise



Who should attend? Anyone whose work includes accessioning, arranging, and describing, or who supervises employees who do that work

Attendees must bring a print copy of the DACS publication to the workshop OR a laptop and/or tablet to access the publication in the Standards Portal since your instructor will ask you to follow along or look at parts of this text. A print version is also available for purchase in the SAA Bookstore, and you’ll have the option to purchase the print version during the online registration process.

What should you know? You should have a basic understanding of the theory and principles of archival arrangement and description. 

Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
avatar for Jackie Dean

Jackie Dean

Head of the Archival Processing Section, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Jackie Dean is the Head of the Archival Processing Section in the Special Collections Technical Services Department at The Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received a B. A. in English and M.S.LS from UNC-Chapel... Read More →



Sunday July 31, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Room 208/209 Hilton Atlanta, 255 Courtland Street NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:00am

Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals #1711
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Fees: Advance / Regular*
SAA Member $215 / $275
Employee of Member Institution $245 / $305
Nonmember $275 / $335 

Course Description
(1 day, .75 CEUs, 1 DAS, 5 ARCs)

The field of digital forensics often evokes imagery of prime-time television crime dramas. But what is it, and how can archivists put digital forensics tools and processes to use in their home institutions? Archivists are more likely than ever to be confronted with collections containing removable storage media (e.g., floppy disks, hard drives, thumb drives, memory sticks, and CDs). These media provide limited accessibility and may endanger the electronic records housed within, due to obsolescence and loss over time. Caring for these records requires archivists to extract whatever useful information resides on the medium while avoiding the accidental alteration of data or metadata.

You’ll explore the layers of hardware and software that allow bitstreams on digital media to be read as files, the roles and relationships of these layers, and tools and techniques for ensuring the completeness and evidential value of data. 

This course is specifically designed as a precursor and prerequisite to the two-day DAS course “Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced.”

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:








  • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles, tools, and technologies behind the practical field of digital forensics





  • Explore how digital forensics tools and techniques can apply to an archival setting





  • Consider a range of digital forensics tools, and use some of them to create disk images and analyze their content for different types of information.









Who should attend?
Archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and others who are responsible for acquiring or transferring collections of digital materials—particularly those that are received on removable media

What you should already know: Basic computer literacy; participants should understand how to install and use software tools listed in the syllabus and be able to read and comprehend basic (though detailed) technical concepts

If you intend to pursue the DAS Certificate, you will need to pass the examination for this course.

Attendance is limited to 35.

* Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $514 / $634
Employee of Member Institutions $584 / $704
Nonmember $700 / $764


Sunday July 31, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Homer Rice Classroom Georgia Tech Library, 266 4th St. NW, Atlanta, GA

5:00pm

 
Monday, August 1
 

9:00am

Arrangement and Description: Fundamentals #1706 (Day 1 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Fees: Advance / Regular
SAA Member: $289 / $349
Employees of Member Institutions: $329 / $389
Nonmember: $379 / $429


Course Description
(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 1 A&D, 10 ARCs)

This workshop introduces the basic principles, concepts, and tools that archivists use to establish both physical and intellectual control over archival records. These include developing accession records and processing work plans; identifying common arrangement schemes for certain types of collections, as well as various formats; and how to physically organize materials during processing. You will also learn the essential elements of a finding aid and the major descriptive standards that support these elements. Particular emphasis will be placed on the day-to-day decisions made in arranging and describing archival materials. You'll also participate in a set of exercises designed to emphasis the principles and concepts of arrangement and description.

Upon completion of this course you'll be able to:






  • Describe the principals and concepts of arrangement;



  • Apply the common arrangement of various types of collections and material formats;



  • Identify the essential elements of a finding aid; 



  • Describe the major standards supporting these elements;



  • Identify basic tools that can be employed to facilitate management of arrangement and description; and 



  • Demonstrate an understanding of best practice






Who should attend? This is an introductory (required if you work towards the A&D Certificate) course that can be taken as a refresher course on arrangement and description by repository managers, archivists, practitioners, and/or anyone responsible for the arrangement and description of archival records.

Knowledge Assumed for this Class: Participants are expected to have basic archival training and education. This course is one of the foundational courses in the Arrangement and Description Curriculum and Certificate Program. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination (forthcoming) for this course.

The Arrangement & Description Competencies Addressed in this Course: 






  • Arrangement: Understand the process of organizing materials with respect to their provenance and original order to protect their context.



  • Description: Analyze, organize, and describe details about the attributes of a record or collection of records to facilitate the work's identification, management, and understanding.



  • Descriptive Standards: Apply rules and practices that codify the content of information used to represent archival materials in discovery tools according to published structural guidelines.



  • Management: Demonstrate ability to manage physical and intellectual control over archival materials. 



  • Discovery: Create tools to facilitate access and disseminate descriptive records of archival materials.



  • Ethics: Convey transparency of actions taken during arrangement and description and respect privacy, confidentiality and cultural sensitivity of archival materials. 






Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
SP

Susan Potts McDonald

Emory University
Susan Potts McDonald is Coordinator of Arrangement and Description Services in the Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. She manages all aspects of accessioning, arrangement, and description including the creation of MARC bibliographic... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Quigley

Sarah Quigley

Manuscript Archivist, The Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University



Monday August 1, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Room 208/209 Hilton Atlanta, 255 Courtland Street NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:00am

Copyright Law for Archivists: A Risk Assessment Approach #1710 (Day 1 of 2)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Fees: Advance / Regular
SAA Members: $295 / $335
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $335 / $365
Nonmembers: $375 / $425

Course Description
(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs)

When is it safe to take a risk? When it comes to copyright, that is a hard question to answer. There is no doubt that copyright rules can sometimes be onerous for archivists. What does one do when even a moderate adherence to the provisions of copyright law seems to inhibit such basic archival work as preservation, reference service, and digitization for external access? Is it worth taking the risk that your decision might land your repository in court? Will your institution back you up if that happens? 

This two-day workshop combines a detailed look at copyright basics with a risk-management approach for archivists to use in assessing their own collections and institutional circumstances. He will show where there can be room to maneuver by explaining the law’s sometimes complex facets, and he will help archivists learn how to determine whether there are existing exceptions and limitations they can use. The ultimate goal is to enable archivists to fulfill their fundamental purpose—achieving as wide a use as possible of their collections.

Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:





  • Recognize the complex issues relating to authors’, owners’, and users’ rights in intellectual property 



  • Obtain grounding in the historical rationale for copyright law, including major legislative and judicial developments 



  • Discover the relevance of U.S. federal law to archives and manuscript collections 



  • Examine the current law 



  • Determine the sequence of decision-making steps needed to manage copyright issues 






Who Should Attend?: Archivists and other professionals who have copyright concerns; participants are invited to submit specific questions related to copyright up to two weeks prior to the workshop start date

Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
WM

William Maher

Professor and University Archivist, University Archives, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
William Maher is the University Archivist at the UofI. In his position he oversees the University Archives, Student Life and Culture Archives, ALA Archives, Ad Council Archives, and the Sousa Archives and Center for American Music. He is a fellow of SAA and expert in copyright ma... Read More →


Monday August 1, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Room 206/207 Hilton Atlanta, 255 Courtland Street NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:00am

Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced #1712 (Day 1 of 2)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Fees: Advance / Regular*
SAA Members: $339 / $399
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $379 / $439
Nonmembers: $465 / $489


Course Description
(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs, 1 DAS)

Are you starting to receive disks as parts of collections or have you discovered disks in boxes of paper records? Caring for the records stored on removable storage media (e.g., floppy disks, hard drives, thumb drives, memory sticks, and CDs) requires archivists to extract whatever useful information resides on the medium while avoiding the accidental alteration of data or metadata. In this course, you’ll learn how to apply existing digital forensics methods and tools in order to recover, preserve, and ultimately provide access to born-digital records. We’ll explore the layers of hardware and software that allow bitstreams on digital media to be read as files, the roles and relationships of these layers, and tools and techniques for ensuring the completeness and evidential value of data. We’ll apply digital forensics tools and methods to test data in order to illustrate how and why they are used.

Note: This course includes exercises with open-source tools in the BitCurator environment. BitCurator is distributed both as a virtual machine and as an installable ISO image.

Students must bring a laptop to the course with the following software already installed. (All software programs are free.) iPads and other tablet devices will NOT be able to perform the hands-on tasks, as these devices do not have adequate resources or allow the level of user control required to run the associated software. 

Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:






  • Explain the roles and relationships between the main layers of technology required to read a string of bits off of a physical storage medium and treat it as a file 



  • Identify various forms of data that may be "hidden" on the physical storage medium 



  • Use write blockers and create disk images in order to prevent accidental manipulation of volatile data 



  • Identify and extract the data that a file system uses to manage files 



  • Apply digital forensics tools and methods to collections of records 



  • Identify and compare alternative strategies for providing public access to data from disk images 






Who Should Attend?: Archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and others who are responsible for acquiring or transferring collections of digital materials, particularly those that are received on removable media

What You Should Already Know: Participants are expected to know basic archival practice and have intermediate knowledge of computers and digital records management.

This course builds on others in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) curriculum, including Basic Electronic Records, Thinking Digital, Accessioning and Ingest of Electronic Records, and Metadata Overview for Archivists.

Attendance is limited to 35.


* Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $514 / $634
Employees of Member Institutions $584 / $704
Nonmember $700 / $764


Monday August 1, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Homer Rice Classroom Georgia Tech Library, 266 4th St. NW, Atlanta, GA

9:00am

9:00am

9:00am

 
Tuesday, August 2
 

9:00am

Arrangement and Description of Audiovisual Materials #1714
Limited Capacity seats available

Fees: Advance / Regular
SAA Members: $189 / $249
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $219 / $279
Nonmembers: $249 / $299


Course Description
(1 day, .75 CEUs, 1 A&D, 5 ARCs)

Learn how to arrange and describe archival sound, video, and film materials found in mixed-media archival collections. In the morning you'll focus on understanding archival audiovisual media with sections on format identification, evaluating content, and assessing institutional capacity for providing access for researchers. In the afternoon, you'll examine processing procedures in depth, including pre-processing assessment of archival audiovisual materials, intellectual and physical arrangement, describing audiovisual materials in EAD according to DACS, and strategies for processing audiovisual materials at minimal, intermediate, and full levels of processing.

Note: This course does NOT cover born-digital sound and video, audiovisual preservation, or digitization.

Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:


  • Plan and implement processing of archival collections with audiovisual media

  • Identify archival audiovisual formats and assess content and generation

  • Arrange audiovisual media physically and intellectually

  • Describe audiovisual media effectively according to DACS and EAD

  • Apply strategies for arrangement and description of media when processing at minimal, intermediate, and full levels

  • Complete processing assessment and planning, arrange items physically and intellectually, and describe at collection/series/folder level using EAD and DACS using an example/case study


Who Should Attend?: Archivists with processing experience who are new to audiovisual media, as well as media archivists who are new to traditional processing

What You Should Already Know: Participants should have working knowledge of the fundamentals of arrangement and description, as well as prior experience with Encoded Archival Description and Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS).

A&D Core Competency:

1. Arrangement: Understand the process of organizing materials with respect to their provenance and original order to protect their context and facilitate access.

2. Description: Analyze and describe details about the attributes of a record or collection of records to facilitate identification, management, and understanding of the work.

3. Descriptive Standards: Apply rules and practices that codify the content of information used to represent archival materials in discovery tools according to published structural guidelines.

4. Management: Demonstrate ability to manage physical and intellectual control over archival materials.

5. Discovery: Create tools to facilitate access and disseminate descriptive records of archival materials.

If you intend to pursue the A&D Certificate, you will need to pass the examination for this course.


Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
avatar for Megan A. McShea

Megan A. McShea

Audiovisual Archivist, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
Megan McShea is the Audiovisual Archivist at the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, where she has been developing and implementing a sustainable program for managing, preserving, and making available films, videos, and sound recordings from the Archives’ mixed-media... Read More →



Tuesday August 2, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum

9:00am

Arrangement and Description: Fundamentals #1706 (Day 2 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Fees: Advance / Regular
SAA Member: $289 / $349
Employees of Member Institutions: $329 / $389
Nonmember: $379 / $429


Course Description
(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 1 A&D, 10 ARCs)

This workshop introduces the basic principles, concepts, and tools that archivists use to establish both physical and intellectual control over archival records. These include developing accession records and processing work plans; identifying common arrangement schemes for certain types of collections, as well as various formats; and how to physically organize materials during processing. You will also learn the essential elements of a finding aid and the major descriptive standards that support these elements. Particular emphasis will be placed on the day-to-day decisions made in arranging and describing archival materials. You'll also participate in a set of exercises designed to emphasis the principles and concepts of arrangement and description.

Upon completion of this course you'll be able to:






  • Describe the principals and concepts of arrangement;



  • Apply the common arrangement of various types of collections and material formats;



  • Identify the essential elements of a finding aid; 



  • Describe the major standards supporting these elements;



  • Identify basic tools that can be employed to facilitate management of arrangement and description; and 



  • Demonstrate an understanding of best practice






Who should attend? This is an introductory (required if you work towards the A&D Certificate) course that can be taken as a refresher course on arrangement and description by repository managers, archivists, practitioners, and/or anyone responsible for the arrangement and description of archival records.

Knowledge Assumed for this Class: Participants are expected to have basic archival training and education. This course is one of the foundational courses in the Arrangement and Description Curriculum and Certificate Program. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination (forthcoming) for this course.

The Arrangement & Description Competencies Addressed in this Course: 






  • Arrangement: Understand the process of organizing materials with respect to their provenance and original order to protect their context.



  • Description: Analyze, organize, and describe details about the attributes of a record or collection of records to facilitate the work's identification, management, and understanding.



  • Descriptive Standards: Apply rules and practices that codify the content of information used to represent archival materials in discovery tools according to published structural guidelines.



  • Management: Demonstrate ability to manage physical and intellectual control over archival materials. 



  • Discovery: Create tools to facilitate access and disseminate descriptive records of archival materials.



  • Ethics: Convey transparency of actions taken during arrangement and description and respect privacy, confidentiality and cultural sensitivity of archival materials. 






Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
SP

Susan Potts McDonald

Emory University
Susan Potts McDonald is Coordinator of Arrangement and Description Services in the Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. She manages all aspects of accessioning, arrangement, and description including the creation of MARC bibliographic... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Quigley

Sarah Quigley

Manuscript Archivist, The Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University



Tuesday August 2, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Room 208/209 Hilton Atlanta, 255 Courtland Street NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:00am

Copyright Law for Archivists: A Risk Assessment Approach #1710 (Day 2 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Fees: Advance / Regular
SAA Members: $295 / $335
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $335 / $365
Nonmembers: $375 / $425

Course Description
(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs)

When is it safe to take a risk? When it comes to copyright, that is a hard question to answer. There is no doubt that copyright rules can sometimes be onerous for archivists. What does one do when even a moderate adherence to the provisions of copyright law seems to inhibit such basic archival work as preservation, reference service, and digitization for external access? Is it worth taking the risk that your decision might land your repository in court? Will your institution back you up if that happens? 

This two-day workshop combines a detailed look at copyright basics with a risk-management approach for archivists to use in assessing their own collections and institutional circumstances. He will show where there can be room to maneuver by explaining the law’s sometimes complex facets, and he will help archivists learn how to determine whether there are existing exceptions and limitations they can use. The ultimate goal is to enable archivists to fulfill their fundamental purpose—achieving as wide a use as possible of their collections.

Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:


  • Recognize the complex issues relating to authors’, owners’, and users’ rights in intellectual property 

  • Obtain grounding in the historical rationale for copyright law, including major legislative and judicial developments 

  • Discover the relevance of U.S. federal law to archives and manuscript collections 

  • Examine the current law 

  • Determine the sequence of decision-making steps needed to manage copyright issues 



Who Should Attend?: Archivists and other professionals who have copyright concerns; participants are invited to submit specific questions related to copyright up to two weeks prior to the workshop start date

Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
WM

William Maher

Professor and University Archivist, University Archives, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
William Maher is the University Archivist at the UofI. In his position he oversees the University Archives, Student Life and Culture Archives, ALA Archives, Ad Council Archives, and the Sousa Archives and Center for American Music. He is a fellow of SAA and expert in copyright ma... Read More →


Tuesday August 2, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Room 206/207 Hilton Atlanta, 255 Courtland Street NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:00am

Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced #1712 (Day 2 of 2)
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Fees: Advance / Regular*
SAA Members: $339 / $399
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $379 / $439
Nonmembers: $465 / $489


Course Description
(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs, 1 DAS)

Are you starting to receive disks as parts of collections or have you discovered disks in boxes of paper records? Caring for the records stored on removable storage media (e.g., floppy disks, hard drives, thumb drives, memory sticks, and CDs) requires archivists to extract whatever useful information resides on the medium while avoiding the accidental alteration of data or metadata. In this course, you’ll learn how to apply existing digital forensics methods and tools in order to recover, preserve, and ultimately provide access to born-digital records. We’ll explore the layers of hardware and software that allow bitstreams on digital media to be read as files, the roles and relationships of these layers, and tools and techniques for ensuring the completeness and evidential value of data. We’ll apply digital forensics tools and methods to test data in order to illustrate how and why they are used.

Note: This course includes exercises with open-source tools in the BitCurator environment. BitCurator is distributed both as a virtual machine and as an installable ISO image.

Students must bring a laptop to the course with the following software already installed. (All software programs are free.) iPads and other tablet devices will NOT be able to perform the hands-on tasks, as these devices do not have adequate resources or allow the level of user control required to run the associated software. 

Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:






  • Explain the roles and relationships between the main layers of technology required to read a string of bits off of a physical storage medium and treat it as a file 



  • Identify various forms of data that may be "hidden" on the physical storage medium 



  • Use write blockers and create disk images in order to prevent accidental manipulation of volatile data 



  • Identify and extract the data that a file system uses to manage files 



  • Apply digital forensics tools and methods to collections of records 



  • Identify and compare alternative strategies for providing public access to data from disk images 






Who Should Attend?: Archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and others who are responsible for acquiring or transferring collections of digital materials, particularly those that are received on removable media

What You Should Already Know: Participants are expected to know basic archival practice and have intermediate knowledge of computers and digital records management.

This course builds on others in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) curriculum, including Basic Electronic Records, Thinking Digital, Accessioning and Ingest of Electronic Records, and Metadata Overview for Archivists.

Attendance is limited to 35.


* Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $514 / $634
Employees of Member Institutions $584 / $704
Nonmember $700 / $764


Tuesday August 2, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Homer Rice Classroom Georgia Tech Library, 266 4th St. NW, Atlanta, GA

9:00am